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Rip DVDs with little quality loss

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  • Hello everybody!

    I want to rip my DVD collection that I saved on hard drives without compression. I want to use it to create space for a spear.

    I would like to use DVDFab as software because I have always had good experiences with this program when copying DVDs to the HDD.

    But what about the settings?

    Which format? MKV or MP4 or avi?

    What resolution?

    I will use AC3 for the sound format because I don't have a sound system.

    For testing, I ripped for 96 hours.

    At that time I worked without compression when copying the DVD. Therefore, the movie file is 5.7 GB. After the ripping, the file has about 2.5 GB as format, I chose MKV and the highest quality. Unfortunately the result is not the best.

    Who can please help me and give me some tips?

    Many Thanks

    Paparomeo

  • Hello,

    With DVDFAb you can take mkv x264 and ac3 ton.

    or there is also

    Handbrake you only need to read the iso and then you can rip mkv with x264 and ac3 ton.

  • Another alternative - I chose this:

    Make a list of DVDs and gradually load all films here as FHD. Then throw away all DVDs (or almost all, about 10 are left). My biggest problem was that I didn't get everything in the garbage can at once, had to wait for the next emptying and our normal household garbage hardly fit in. If you have a 4k TV in 65/75 "and have seen a DVD toilet movie, then you no longer watch something like that voluntarily.

  • @ 2Fast2Furios

    did you mean these attitudes?

    RalfZ
    Thank you, I'll do it when I can get cheap storage media, i.e. HDD.

  • 2Fast2Furious

    Deinterlacing?
    What is that good for?

  • The parameters look pretty neat. For 720x3xx the data rate is also completely OK. With fast movements, the image should easily be superior to the micro "HD" s that are so widespread here. Problem is stop the source material with 720x576. I made Bluray rips with 720x3xx which were clearly superior to a DVD rip. Just do a few trial runs and test with at least a 55 "TV.

  • The parameters look pretty neat. For 720x3xx the data rate is also completely OK. With fast movements, the image should easily be superior to the micro "HD" s that are so widespread here. Problem is stop the source material with 720x576. I made Bluray rips with 720x3xx which were clearly superior to a DVD rip. Just do a few trial runs and test with at least a 55 "TV.

    Thanks, I'll do that.

  • The parameters look pretty neat. For 720x3xx the data rate is also completely OK. With fast movements, the image should easily be superior to the micro "HD" s that are so widespread here. Problem is stop the source material with 720x576. I made Bluray rips with 720x3xx which were clearly superior to a DVD rip. Just do a few trial runs and test with at least a 55 "TV.

    Redkill01Bane1565

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  • I just want the opinion of two experts on this.

    If something is on your mind, don't be afraid to write to me!

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  • Hello gentlemen and ladies! And thank you for making a mark Lucy!

    Interesting .. Interesting! So ... without wanting to get close to someone, my dear RalfZ cannot speak of thinking about your statement about our microHDs here. And the comparison is just as unrealistic as a VW Beetle with a Porsche 911 want to compare. As I said: you can't even compare a 720 * 3xx encode with our 1080p (1920 * 1080p) microHDs and put it on the same level. If it were the same, I would say our microHDs can hold a candle to a 4K rip ... just too ridiculous!

    I especially liked it Quote: "I made Bluray rips with 720x3xx, which were clearly superior to a DVD rip!" Quote end. WOW! Big cinema.
    So - of course! It's not a big rocket science either Bluray with a resolution up to five times higher than conventional DVD to scale down. The DVD can a maximum resolution of 720 * 480 with 414,720 pixels. The Blu-Ray-Disc delivers 2,073,600 pixels with a Full HD resolution (1,920 * 1,080) ... find the error!

    Well then .. on the small 32 "TV (possibly tab / mobile phone or with luck on a 40" inch) 720 * 480 might just come across as okay, but at the latest on / with the 50 "/ 55" TV or even more higher comes the truth to light. And nobody wants to do that to themselves. Once a DVD on a 55 "TV and you watch voluntarily never DVD again.

    In addition, we also use completely different setting parameters for our audio and video bit rates for our microHDs than those of paparomeo mentioned above. On the one hand, this is also because we do not encode with DVDFab. Apart from bit rates, audio and video codec settings, DVDFab doesn't offer very much. It's just a one-click tool for beginners ... which is OK too.

    B Frame and Max Frame, Adaptive Direct Mode or Motion est Method settings are completely missing here. But good; There is the right shoes for every foot ... ummm programs, and everyone should work and be happy with their program of choice.


    Staytuned,

    RED

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  • The DVD can have a maximum resolution of 720 * 480 with 414,720 pixels.

    That is not right. A European DVD (PAL) has a resolution of 704x536 or 720x536 pixels

    In addition, I can only join in with my prescriber.

    Now even every very old television has a native resolution of 1920x1080, i.e. full HD.

    If you then feed it with a downscaled BD film, that contradicts pretty much all common sense.

    So you take a source that corresponds to the native resolution of most televisions and encode it with 720x3xx only so that the television inflates it again to its own resolution of 1920x1080 "(because an LCD television cannot display anything else because the pixels are permanently installed) .

    The processor built into the television fills the 720x3xx image of the film with additional color-like pixels, which only distorts and blurs the image.

    Since a quality loss occurs with every conversion process, the 720x3xx version CANNOT produce a better picture than a 1920x1080 pixel version drawn from the same source because the 720x3xx version is "converted" or upscaled by the television a second time.

  • So, now I have left the topic and did not go into the actual question from paparomeo. Sorry!

    But what about the settings?


    Which format? MKV or MP4 or avi?

    What resolution?

    MKV (H.264 / AVC) is standard, of course H.265 (HEVC) is much better in terms of compression BUT it takes a lot of computing time to render. That means 3 times as long for a film. Another disadvantage: older TV sets cannot read the codec. I still have an older Samsung (8 years old) in my daughters' nursery who has never heard of H.265. Screen stays black. So you should think twice about that. The same goes for E-AC3 vs AC3.

    However, if you want to stream your films, e.g. from the Fritzbox into your home network, you should stay with AAC for testing purposes. For example, Samsung has / had a playback problem with AC3 on its older devices. If you have the VLC app on it, you don't have to worry about AC3. Anyway, it's going for me. I can't say how it looks today with brand new models. But it just seems to be / have been a licensing problem, as I have read. AVI would be a step backwards, unless you still have a tube TV ala 4: 3

    resolution: Well aaaa .. now we go into the canned!

    Older DVDs (70s + 80s) with a resolution of 704 × 576/720 × 576 pixels (25Hz) and possibly still in 4: 3 does not leave much room for maneuver with DVDFab!
    I wouldn't do the job. You won't win any prizes or do yourself any favors. Why do DVD vaping in the age of Bluray ??? The SVCD times are long gone ... !! Nobody plays their music with a compact cassette today! Vinyl is something else again. The black records somehow sound better.

    Anyway - my tip!

    Films from your collection, which are available on Bluray, I would download HERE from NOX or get them from the video library (there are still some) or get them from friends. And render in your desired resolution. The resolution should be always be the same as your source. If you have a DVD video rip with 704 * 576 then a higher resolution e.g. 1280 * 720 won't bring you any further. In other words, it won't work. Here the video bitrate is the be-all and end-all. And here there is too no Standard "it always works" attitude. Every video is different. Since I don't know your DVD rips and how good the condition of the output source is, you should do some tests. Start with 1500 and work your way up to 2000 if necessary 2500 kb / s in an emergency

    But then you can use the microHD's and save yourself the work. Doesn't make sense to watch a DVD Rip 704 × 576 on a FullHD device!

    Anyway .. paparomeo, I have two (2) examples for you. Original DVD "The sea wolves are coming (year 1980)", created with DVDFab! Once with 1500 kb / s and once with 2000 kb / s. Video resolution like DVD source: 720 * 412 (16: 9), audio: AC3 with 192 kb / s. 1 pass. Are only the first 2 minutes of the film. BUT make yourself a picture ...

    Seewolfe_Test-Rip.rar

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